Thursday (10/19/2017) - Morning

40 Minute Forks Fuz Sanderson

Don't eat your salad with a spoon! This is a carving gateway skill. We'll make a fork you can use in the wilderness, or in the office... Age 12 and above. you will need a sharp knife.

Bamboo Fish Traps Snow Bear

Teens welcome.

Beginning Wet Felting Colleen Hewlett

Learn to manipulate loose wool roving around a resist to create a seamless felted pouch. An introduction to this primitive textile skill that uses hot water, soap, and “elbow grease” to turn loose fibers into a sturdy, solid fabric. Ages 10+

Capote (making wool blanket coats) Raven Carlson

Capote Capote - French word meaning cape - is hand sewing a 100% wool blanket into a snuggy hug of a coat. It takes today and tomorrow (and sometimes half of the 3rd day) to pattern, fit, cut and start sewing pieces cut from a wool blanket into a coat. I bring a variety of blankets (colors, sizes, old, new) to buy which includes the material fee. The minimum material fee is $10 IF you have your own blanket(s). My inventory of wool blankets is quite large and I do not bring them all to the class. If there is a specific color that you are wanting, email me at bagladyaz@gmail.com and I can bring your color(s) to rendezvous. Class location is at Raven and Coyote's camp.

Crocheted Mat Making Vikki Blalock

Make a mat for sitting on the ground. This is an all day class. The morning class will be making your cordage to crochete with from plastic bags. This is an adult class but if you are a child who already knows the basics of crocheting, you are welcome.

Cultural Trends in the Ancient Living Skills Communities: A public forum Hawk Hurst

Participants will share and discuss cultural trends they are witnessing in the ancient (primitive) living skills communities. All manner of civil and appropriately stated ideas, concerns, comments, & stories, from all ages, will be most welcome.

Flintknapping James Clinkscales

In this class you can learn the basics of stone age tool manufacture techniques or hone your skills to the next level! We will cover reduction process including percussion and pressure flaking techniques using stone, bone and antler billets.

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife. Class will require a minimum of 1 1/2 days. After this ALL DAY CLASS, you have the option to drop in as the week progresses to work on your project at your own pace.

Kudzu Water Bottle Holder Nancy Basket

Learn all about the invasive plant that can do about everything while random free forming a birds nest like water bottle holder. Bring your own container.

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Medicine as Food - How to Preserve Your Herbs as Foods Jamie Sparks

These mountains are full of herbal medicines that our body can enjoy and utilize to increase our vitality and maximize our nutritional intake. Learn who and how as we meet and taste many forms of some of these wild plants that will keep your body vital and wild and just a bit less domesticated. Come learn how to create herbal vinegars, honeys, powders and so much more that can easily allow you to "eat something wild everyday".

Pottery Keith Grenoble

Pottery! Pottery! Pottery! Come work with rotted rock. We'll be making bowls, cups, beads, shakers, small oil lamps, figurines - whatever your imagination desires. Pinch pots, coiling, paddling, burnishing - learn the many methods and techniques with master primitive potter Keith.

Rivercane Flutes or Blowguns White Eagle Taylor

Make a Native American flute or blowgun out of rivercane - your choice. Class open to ages 8 and up (or younger with a parent or guardian).

Spoon Carving Barron Brown

Come carve your own spoon! Please bring a sharp knife. All ages welcome. Kids under 10 need to bring a parent.

Tipi Living Skills Joan Candalino

Skills for living in the tipi - dealing with fire and smoke flaps, appropriate knots, poles, transportation, construction details. We will be pitching (putting the tipi up) for the week. Optional continuation of discussion in the tipi this evening after supper. Also, welcome to come by Sunday midday when the process goes into reverse and we strike (take down) the tipi. Note: if Darry Wood is coming this weekend and offering this class, by all means go to his class and learn from the master!

Thursday (10/19/2017) - Afternoon

Appalachian Cup and Ball Jerry TwoBear

Medicine men used this game to teach eye/hand coordination. Ages 7 and up to 77.

Bamboo Fish Traps Snow Bear

Teens welcome.

Capote (making wool blanket coats) Raven Carlson

THIS IS A CONTINUATION CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING. Making a Capote - French word meaning cape - is hand sewing a 100% wool blanket into a snuggy coat. It takes time to pattern, fit, cut and start sewing pieces cut from a wool blanket into a coat. I bring a variety of blankets (colors, sizes, old, new) to buy which includes the material fee. The minimum material fee is $10 IF you have your own blanket(s). My inventory of wool blankets is quite large and I do not bring them all to rendezvous. If there is a specific color that you are wanting, email me at bagladyaz@gmail.com and I can bring the colors(s) to rendezvous. Class location is Raven and Coyote's camp.

Cordage Clinic Jeff Gottlieb

Make strong, beautiful, useful string and rope from natural fibers. All skill levels welcome. We'll learn about sources for fibers, methods of collecting and processing, and techniques for turning fibers into handmade cordage. Instructor's book on cordage, "Fibers of Life" will be available for sale if desired.

Crocheted Mat Making Vikki Blalock

Continued from the morning. Finish your mat to sit on the ground with from plastic bags.

FUN-damentals of Fire - Fire From the Landscape Bill Kaczor

Have you spent a lot of time around fires? Have you been helping keep them burning but never actually built one with all natural materials... Fear no more!!! We will explore the forest and learn how to identify, harvest and use the proper materials to build the most efficient structures to light a successful one match fire. If you can light a fire using one match then you will succeed with a coal from a friction fire kit. Once the concepts are learned and time permits we will put them to the test through several fire challenges and demo some friction fire techniques!

Hand drill friction fire Nick Neddo

Learn to find, make and use the hand drill as a viable fire option. Develop form and technique that leads to a greater level of mastery of this ancient and simple technology. 15 students.

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

CONTINUATION FROM MORNING CLASS. NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE. Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife. Class will require a minimum of 1 1/2 days. After this ALL DAY CLASS, you have the option to drop in as the week progresses to work on your project at your own pace.

Kudzu Water Bottle Holder or Freeform Basket Nancy Basket

Continue the morning class or make a freeform basket. Make a handle or lid.

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

CONTINUATION OF CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Making Hunting Boomerangs (Rabbitsticks) Denton Bragg

MAKING AND FLYING THE HUNTING BOOMERANG Denton Bragg, Instructor Of all the ingenious hunting weaponry of ancient humans, the 'Kylie' or hunting boomerang is undoubtedly the most amazing. Dating back at least 30,000 years to a few examples unearthed in the steppes of Eurasia (made of mammoth ivory!) these implements are among the most effective and productive hunting tools for medium sized animals. Nearly every ancient culture used them. One almost intact artifact of mammoth ivory would have originally measured over 1 2/3 meters along the curve and would have been capable of breaking the legs of even large deer or antelope. Perhaps even more effective is their effectiveness today in hunting large flocking birds, particularly waterfowl or turkey (unfortunately most current game laws would frown on this). They have been used (youtube video) with deadly precision on taking fruit bats in flight. What is so astounding about this class of weaponry is that these things actually FLY! How long did it take for humans to improve a curved limb of a tree into the elegantly flattened and carved examples, employing the incredibly complex concept of 'airfoil' to challenge the effect of gravity. Eons later far simpler aspects of the airfoil were incorporated into the first airplane wings. To our ancient ancestors the ability to craft a device that acted entirely differently from any other object they threw (like when a rock or ordinary stick was thrown) must have seemed magical. And it still is! The specific theoretical physics of the hunting boomerang remain somewhat murky though the basic concept is fairly clear. That each handmade stick, having been fashioned from the natural curve of a growing tree, is unique in mass, curvature and grain makes for 'tuning' a hunting stick extremely intricate and somewhat mysterious. It remains unique in the category of objects that 'fly' in that it relies on no companion wing or structure to stabilize its flight. Airplanes, helicopters, and other craft utilizing airfoil design must have a companion device that completes its function of lift (stabilizers, collectives, etc), otherwise they won't remain stable in flight. The well-tuned hunting stick relies on its eccentricity of both lift dihedral and asymmetry in length to balance out lift to forward momentum in order to fly in a relatively straight trajectory. It is far more complex to fashion than the 'sport' boomerangs most people know about precisely because of the difficulty in compensating for the tendency to lift and rise almost into a 'stall', turn over, and finally fall back in an arc to nearly the point of launch (returning boomerang). The hunting stick should continue in nearly a straight line of flight towards a target, finally losing lift and forward momentum as rotation slows and gravity wins. The longest flight so far recorded is over 400 meters (Guiness record now at 429 yards)! That was accomplished with a lighter composite stick thrown into a high trajectory. Today we differentiate these hunting sticks from 'boomerangs'. Sport boomerangs are light-weight toys meant to describe something of a circle so they return to the vicinity of the thrower. While they are an amusing pastime comparable to Frisbees, they have little resemblance and usefulness to hunting boomerangs. Hunting sticks, Rabbitsticks, Kylies, or whatever other name given them are serious, heavy-mass weapons meant to fly in a nearly straight line (or in a predictable 'hook' flight, meant to converge with a flock of birds lifting off). It's difficult enough to aim, throw and hit game with a weapon without that weapon going off in some parabolic path from what was intended. And Kylies are dangerous or lethal to anything in their path—you don't want them coming back at you! It's likely that returning boomerangs were experiments (or accidents) of carving in too much curvature of facial profile, too exaggerated an airfoil, or combinations of all these, and finding that the result had its own idea in where it wanted to go. It wasn't useful therein as a much of a hunting weapon but certainly created interest for other reasons. In N. America we now refer to this 'hunting class' of weaponry as 'Rabbitsticks', and nod to examples of primarily Southwestern U.S. artifacts found in dry caves associated with Anasazy, Basketmaker, and Hopi cultures. We will primarily be using natural 'knees' or crooks of dense eastern hardwoods. Using hand woodworking tools, each blank will be shaped and tuned into a flying hunting stick. This is an adult class and some experience and proficiency in use of hand woodworking tools is required (as well as serious dedication to completing the project). The length of time to finish depends on the participant's carving skills and the blank chosen. Typically, one 'could' be completed in one day, but more likely up to three days. Instruction on final sanding, tuning (tweaking the flight characteristics to modify how it flies), painting or decorating, and suggestions for protective finish, will be given so it can be completed at home. Materials cost vary depending on the pre-cut blanks, from $15-35. They must be dense hardwoods with a natural curve of grain to follow the shape of the stick. Otherwise the intense shock of a thrown stick hitting a hard object would cause it to break. Participants may wish to cut and bring their own blanks, but the curve, flatness and dimensions must work for a stick or your time and effort will be for naught and find out why it's so difficult to find and harvest good, natural crook blanks suitable for this project). Class size 10

Medicine Making with a focus on making elderberry syrup Ivy Lynn

introduction and overview - We will be making medicines in the class with a focus on making elderberry syrup

Plant Distillation Marie-Lies Van Asten

Learn how to distill plants, roots and resins using a copper still to make hydrosols (i.e. rose water & orange water). When a plant is distilled, its essential oil, hydrosol or both can be extracted. Hydrosols can be used as toners, added to cream, to flavor foods, etc. Everyone will take some hydrosol home.

Pottery Keith Grenoble

Pottery! Pottery! Pottery! Come work with rotted rock. We'll be making bowls, cups, beads, shakers, small oil lamps, figurines - whatever your imagination desires. Pinch pots, coiling, paddling, burnishing - learn the many methods and techniques with master primitive potter Keith.

Rivercane Flute Making Hawk Hurst

Participants will make and learn to play a traditional Native American-style rivercane flut - end-blown, pentatonic scale. All Ages. $10 Material/Tool Use Fee.

Rivercane Flutes or Blowguns White Eagle Taylor

Make a Rivercane blowgun and or flute - your choice. Open to ages 8 and up (or younger with a parent our guardian).

Soapstone and Yucca Cordage Bracelets Camper Bob

Learn to work small pieces of soapstone with simple stone and metal tools and spin a piece of Yucca cordage to tie it into a bracelet.

Survival: 14 Plus Ways to Start a Fire Without Matches or Lighters Coyote Smith

Starting fires with numerous items and techniques you may not be thinking of or have knowledge of. Some primitive - some using modern materials. Ages 10 and above.

Timber Framing Barron Brown

Come learn the classic art of building structures using timber framing techniques. We will be building an actual structure on the land. Come join us!

Twined Bags Joan Candalino

Twining basics. Small bags using the twining (two weavers) technique with cotton, jute, or hemp warp and yarn weavers. Bonus skill: super quick 4 ply corded strap.

Working out the Kinks: Fingers, Hands, Wrists, Forearms & Elbows Bill Parravano

Teach your body to recover faster after primitive & homesteading skills. Got a sore, stiff, tight, achy, or painful fingers, hands, wrists, forearms and elbows? Then this class is for you! Learn the secrets of your body's nervous system. You will walk away from this class with a working knowledge of how to eliminate tension in these areas of your body no matter what your age. Bring your own pillows, blankets and yoga mats to get the most benefit out of this class

Friday (10/20/2017) - Morning

Beginning Wet Felting Colleen Hewlett

Learn to manipulate loose wool roving around a resist to create a seamless felted pouch. This is an introduction to this primitive textile skill that uses hot water, soap, and “elbow grease” to turn loose fibers into a sturdy, solid fabric. Ages 10+

Bird Walk! AKA ornithology, ecology and other mythologies. Fuz Sanderson

This class includes bird id by sight, sound, and behavior, as well as ecological interconnections and ways of enhancing your awareness ( the most important wilderness skill). And once upon a time we may tell some mythological stories that tie it all together.

Bowl Carving Barron Brown

Come carve your own bowl! Learn the joys of working with green wood. Please bring a sharp knife. It may take you more than one class period to finish your project.

Capote (making wool blanket coats) Raven Carlson

CLASS CONTINUED FROM THURSDAY. No new students, please. Capote - French word meaning cape - is hand sewing a 100% wool blanket into a snuggy hug of a coat. It takes today and tomorrow (and sometimes half of the 3rd day) to pattern, fit, cut and start sewing pieces cut from a wool blanket into a coat. I bring a variety of blankets (colors, sizes, old, new) to buy which includes the material fee. The minimum material fee is $10 IF you have your own blanket(s). My inventory of wool blankets is quite large and I do not bring them all to the class. If there is a specific color that you are wanting, email me at bagladyaz@gmail.com and I can bring your color(s) to rendezvous. Class location is at Raven and Coyote's camp.

Continuing Making Hunting Boomerangs Denton Bragg

MAKING AND FLYING THE HUNTING BOOMERANG Denton Bragg, Instructor Of all the ingenious hunting weaponry of ancient humans, the 'Kylie' or hunting boomerang is undoubtedly the most amazing. Dating back at least 30,000 years to a few examples unearthed in the steppes of Eurasia (made of mammoth ivory!) these implements are among the most effective and productive hunting tools for medium sized animals. Nearly every ancient culture used them. One almost intact artifact of mammoth ivory would have originally measured over 1 2/3 meters along the curve and would have been capable of breaking the legs of even large deer or antelope. Perhaps even more effective is their effectiveness today in hunting large flocking birds, particularly waterfowl or turkey (unfortunately most current game laws would frown on this). They have been used (youtube video) with deadly precision on taking fruit bats in flight. What is so astounding about this class of weaponry is that these things actually FLY! How long did it take for humans to improve a curved limb of a tree into the elegantly flattened and carved examples, employing the incredibly complex concept of 'airfoil' to challenge the effect of gravity. Eons later far simpler aspects of the airfoil were incorporated into the first airplane wings. To our ancient ancestors the ability to craft a device that acted entirely differently from any other object they threw (like when a rock or ordinary stick was thrown) must have seemed magical. And it still is! The specific theoretical physics of the hunting boomerang remain somewhat murky though the basic concept is fairly clear. That each handmade stick, having been fashioned from the natural curve of a growing tree, is unique in mass, curvature and grain makes for 'tuning' a hunting stick extremely intricate and somewhat mysterious. It remains unique in the category of objects that 'fly' in that it relies on no companion wing or structure to stabilize its flight. Airplanes, helicopters, and other craft utilizing airfoil design must have a companion device that completes its function of lift (stabilizers, collectives, etc), otherwise they won't remain stable in flight. The well-tuned hunting stick relies on its eccentricity of both lift dihedral and asymmetry in length to balance out lift to forward momentum in order to fly in a relatively straight trajectory. It is far more complex to fashion than the 'sport' boomerangs most people know about precisely because of the difficulty in compensating for the tendency to lift and rise almost into a 'stall', turn over, and finally fall back in an arc to nearly the point of launch (returning boomerang). The hunting stick should continue in nearly a straight line of flight towards a target, finally losing lift and forward momentum as rotation slows and gravity wins. The longest flight so far recorded is over 400 meters (Guiness record now at 429 yards)! That was accomplished with a lighter composite stick thrown into a high trajectory. Today we differentiate these hunting sticks from 'boomerangs'. Sport boomerangs are light-weight toys meant to describe something of a circle so they return to the vicinity of the thrower. While they are an amusing pastime comparable to Frisbees, they have little resemblance and usefulness to hunting boomerangs. Hunting sticks, Rabbitsticks, Kylies, or whatever other name given them are serious, heavy-mass weapons meant to fly in a nearly straight line (or in a predictable 'hook' flight, meant to converge with a flock of birds lifting off). It's difficult enough to aim, throw and hit game with a weapon without that weapon going off in some parabolic path from what was intended. And Kylies are dangerous or lethal to anything in their path—you don't want them coming back at you! It's likely that returning boomerangs were experiments (or accidents) of carving in too much curvature of facial profile, too exaggerated an airfoil, or combinations of all these, and finding that the result had its own idea in where it wanted to go. It wasn't useful therein as a much of a hunting weapon but certainly created interest for other reasons. In N. America we now refer to this 'hunting class' of weaponry as 'Rabbitsticks', and nod to examples of primarily Southwestern U.S. artifacts found in dry caves associated with Anasazy, Basketmaker, and Hopi cultures. We will primarily be using natural 'knees' or crooks of dense eastern hardwoods. Using hand woodworking tools, each blank will be shaped and tuned into a flying hunting stick. This is an adult class and some experience and proficiency in use of hand woodworking tools is required (as well as serious dedication to completing the project). The length of time to finish depends on the participant's carving skills and the blank chosen. Typically, one 'could' be completed in one day, but more likely up to three days. Instruction on final sanding, tuning (tweaking the flight characteristics to modify how it flies), painting or decorating, and suggestions for protective finish, will be given so it can be completed at home. Materials cost vary depending on the pre-cut blanks, from $15-35. They must be dense hardwoods with a natural curve of grain to follow the shape of the stick. Otherwise the intense shock of a thrown stick hitting a hard object would cause it to break. Participants may wish to cut and bring their own blanks, but the curve, flatness and dimensions must work for a stick or your time and effort will be for naught and find out why it's so difficult to find and harvest good, natural crook blanks suitable for this project). Class size 10

Door Chime/ Wind Chimes Vikki Blalock

Make pretty sounds using wood and recycled glass globes. Can hang by the doorway for visitors to announce their arrival or in the yard for the wind to catch.

Face Cream Making Marie-Lies Van Asten

Learn to make your own face cream using infused oils, hydrosols and beeswax. We will use the hydrosol we made on Thursday in the cream. Everyone will take some home.

FUN-damentals of Fire by Friction- Bow Drill Method Bill Kaczor

This is a rendezvous first-timers' required class! Fire is arguably the most important element in human history. In this class we will learn one of our ancestors' methods of making fire that spanned continents in its' application. Each participant in the class will make a "bow-drill friction fire" kit and get some quality practice in the art of making a friction fire. It is one of the most rewarding skills in self-sufficiency and a must in one's basic training of being a human. Please come with a sharp knife. I will walk through all the steps to successfully create a bow drill fire using your personal kit that you create.

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife. Class will require a minimum of 1 1/2 days. After this ALL DAY CLASS, you have the option to drop in as the week progresses to work on your project at your own pace.

Knotted Net Bags & Digging Sticks or Rabbit Sticks Snow Bear

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

CONTINUATION OF CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING - NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Meditative Archery Janara Nerone

Learn archery techniques from a two-time state champion, lifetime archer, and bow huntress Janara Nerone! Janara’s style is a unique blend of instinctive shooting, medieval and renaissance archery and modern Olympic style, along with mindfulness techniques. This style is well suited to traditional bowhunters, traditional target archers and historical recreationists! Equipment provided, but please feel free to bring your own traditional or primitive bow and arrows. Come prepared to move your body! Equipment provided for 12 students. If you have your own equipment and the class is full, you are welcome to attend.

Nut Processing Jeff Gottlieb

We will learn about several species of edible nuts found in our area, crack, extract and prepare them for eating. Check out the clever traditional and modern tools for working with them. You do not want to miss the acorn cookies! Age limit 10 and up.

Pigments and Paint from Stones Nick Neddo

Hunt and gather rocks and learn how to harvest their colors for painting anything you want. Discover the magic ingredients that distinguish one paint from another. We’ll check out primitive paintbrushes too. Bring skills and projects to paint. 10 students.

Pottery Keith Grenoble

Pottery! Pottery! Pottery! Come work with rotted rock. We'll be making bowls, cups, beads, shakers, small oil lamps, figurines - whatever your imagination desires. Pinch pots, coiling, paddling, burnishing - learn the many methods and techniques with master primitive potter Keith.

Rivercane Flute Making, Native American-style Hawk Hurst

Participants will learn to hand-craft their own Native American-style, end-blown, river cane flute. Adults & Youth-Ages 10 and up. Materials/Tool Use Fee: $10.00

Soapstone and Yucca Cordage Bracelets Camper Bob

Learn to work small pieces of soapstone with simple stone and metal tools and then spin a piece of yucca cordage to tie your stone into a bracelet.

Some Sewing Fun Gail Torchio

A sewing class playing with basic stitches and circles of fabric and felt. We will make either a mug rug or a needle keep. A mug rug is like a coaster, just more fun. A needle keep, in this case, will be a round pocket to keep small sewing supplies in. No experience necessary.

Trashbag Rainsuits Critter Watts

With a roll of contractor bags and a roll of duct tape, you can make three piece rain suits for your whole family. Come learn how, and be nice and dry when the rain comes. Bring water, something to sit on, a sharp knife/scissors (if you have one), Kids 12+ with an adult.

Friday (10/20/2017) - Afternoon

Survival: 40 Plus Ways to Acquire Animal Protein Without Hunting, Fishing, Trapping or Snaring Coyote Smith

Ways of getting animal protein food from various locations when really hungry in survival mode or other times when your usual ways of getting food are not available. Ages 10 and above.

Ancient Games, Stories, & Songs You Can Share Hawk Hurst

Games, Songs, and Stories from Ancient Cultures will be explored, shared, and enjoyed.

Bull Roarers Jerry TwoBear

Bull Roarers used by Native Americans to insure good hunts, fishing, weather, and intentions.

Coal-Burned Spoons Fuz Sanderson

Use fire as a tool! In this class, we'll be using hot coals to burn the bowl section of a spoon. We'll also be using basic carving techniques to work the handles, so please bring a sharp knife. Ages 13 and up.

Cont. Making Hunting Boomerangs Denton Bragg

Empowering Women through Herbs and Ritual Ivy Lynn

We will look at each phase of a woman’s life: menstruation, sexuality, fertility, pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. We will look at a few herbs for each phase, we will discuss many issues that effect us in each and how to empower ourselves and each other. We will also consider the cycles of the moon and the cycles of the year and how attuning to them will help us attune to ourselves and the planet.

Flintknapping James Clinkscales

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

CONTINUATION FROM MORNING CLASS. NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE. Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife. Class will require a minimum of 1 1/2 days. After this ALL DAY CLASS, you have the option to drop in as the week progresses to work on your project at your own pace.

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

CONTINUATION OF CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING - NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Pottery Keith Grenoble

Pottery! Pottery! Pottery! Come work with rotted rock. We'll be making bowls, cups, beads, shakers, small oil lamps, figurines - whatever your imagination desires. Pinch pots, coiling, paddling, burnishing - learn the many methods and techniques with master primitive potter Keith.

Rivercane Flutes or Blowguns White Eagle Taylor

Make a Native American flute or blowgun from rivercane. Ages 8 and up (or younger with a parent or guardian).

Spinning wool on a drop spindle Jamie Sparks

Learn to prepare and spin wool fleece to create yarn on a drop spindle. Then have the opportunity to spin your wool on different drop spindles and explore a bit of what is possible. Warning: spinning is an addictive past time!

Timber Framing Barron Brown

Come learn the classic art of building structures using timber framing techniques. We will be building an actual structure on the land. Come join us!

Twined Bags - water bottle holder Joan Candalino

Twining (two weavers) technique with cotton, jute, or hemp warp and cotton, jute, hemp, or yarn weavers. If you are already comfortable with the basic technique, I can get you started on a water bottle holder.

Useful Knots Critter Watts

Knots are incredibly useful and versatile. It's my hope that I can help make them easy and fun as well. We'll start with a few of my favorite "go to" knots - simple to learn and tie; then we'll play with some concepts and applications. Feel free to come assist folks to learn if you have the knowledge already. I can always use teaching help with this class. And please bring and show me exciting knots toward the end of class or outside class time You will need: * blankets, pads or chairs to sit on if you like * books or rope (optional) * water * a good attitude * questions This class is open to everybody. Children should be accompanied by an adult unless they are old enough to participate by themselves.

Working out the Kinks: Toes, Feet, Ankles, Shins and Knees Bill Parravano

Teach your body to recover faster after primitive & homesteading skills. Got a sore, stiff, tight, achy, or painful toes, feet, ankles, shins and knees? Then this class is for you! Learn the secrets of your body's nervous system. You will walk away from this class with a working knowledge of how to eliminate tension in these areas of your body no matter what your age. Bring your own pillows, blankets and yoga mats to get the most benefit out of this class

Saturday (10/21/2017) - Morning

Braided Kudzu Mask Nancy Basket

Braid split kudzu and sew lengths together for a beautiful "Halloween" mask.

Buckskin Bags Joan Candalino

Tobacco pouch type buckskin leather bags - with/without fringe, drawstring or with flap, showing several techniques for sewing. No materials fee if you bring your own buckskin to use. Commercial buckskin available for purchase, cost depends on the size of your bag, $5 to 20.

Cold Process Soapmaking Marie-Lies Van Asten

Learn to make soap using the cold process method using oils, lye, water and plants/clays to color the soap. Everyone will take a bar of soap home.

Cont. Making Hunting Boomerangs Denton Bragg

MAKING AND FLYING THE HUNTING BOOMERANG Denton Bragg, Instructor Of all the ingenious hunting weaponry of ancient humans, the 'Kylie' or hunting boomerang is undoubtedly the most amazing. Dating back at least 30,000 years to a few examples unearthed in the steppes of Eurasia (made of mammoth ivory!) these implements are among the most effective and productive hunting tools for medium sized animals. Nearly every ancient culture used them. One almost intact artifact of mammoth ivory would have originally measured over 1 2/3 meters along the curve and would have been capable of breaking the legs of even large deer or antelope. Perhaps even more effective is their effectiveness today in hunting large flocking birds, particularly waterfowl or turkey (unfortunately most current game laws would frown on this). They have been used (youtube video) with deadly precision on taking fruit bats in flight. What is so astounding about this class of weaponry is that these things actually FLY! How long did it take for humans to improve a curved limb of a tree into the elegantly flattened and carved examples, employing the incredibly complex concept of 'airfoil' to challenge the effect of gravity. Eons later far simpler aspects of the airfoil were incorporated into the first airplane wings. To our ancient ancestors the ability to craft a device that acted entirely differently from any other object they threw (like when a rock or ordinary stick was thrown) must have seemed magical. And it still is! The specific theoretical physics of the hunting boomerang remain somewhat murky though the basic concept is fairly clear. That each handmade stick, having been fashioned from the natural curve of a growing tree, is unique in mass, curvature and grain makes for 'tuning' a hunting stick extremely intricate and somewhat mysterious. It remains unique in the category of objects that 'fly' in that it relies on no companion wing or structure to stabilize its flight. Airplanes, helicopters, and other craft utilizing airfoil design must have a companion device that completes its function of lift (stabilizers, collectives, etc), otherwise they won't remain stable in flight. The well-tuned hunting stick relies on its eccentricity of both lift dihedral and asymmetry in length to balance out lift to forward momentum in order to fly in a relatively straight trajectory. It is far more complex to fashion than the 'sport' boomerangs most people know about precisely because of the difficulty in compensating for the tendency to lift and rise almost into a 'stall', turn over, and finally fall back in an arc to nearly the point of launch (returning boomerang). The hunting stick should continue in nearly a straight line of flight towards a target, finally losing lift and forward momentum as rotation slows and gravity wins. The longest flight so far recorded is over 400 meters (Guiness record now at 429 yards)! That was accomplished with a lighter composite stick thrown into a high trajectory. Today we differentiate these hunting sticks from 'boomerangs'. Sport boomerangs are light-weight toys meant to describe something of a circle so they return to the vicinity of the thrower. While they are an amusing pastime comparable to Frisbees, they have little resemblance and usefulness to hunting boomerangs. Hunting sticks, Rabbitsticks, Kylies, or whatever other name given them are serious, heavy-mass weapons meant to fly in a nearly straight line (or in a predictable 'hook' flight, meant to converge with a flock of birds lifting off). It's difficult enough to aim, throw and hit game with a weapon without that weapon going off in some parabolic path from what was intended. And Kylies are dangerous or lethal to anything in their path—you don't want them coming back at you! It's likely that returning boomerangs were experiments (or accidents) of carving in too much curvature of facial profile, too exaggerated an airfoil, or combinations of all these, and finding that the result had its own idea in where it wanted to go. It wasn't useful therein as a much of a hunting weapon but certainly created interest for other reasons. In N. America we now refer to this 'hunting class' of weaponry as 'Rabbitsticks', and nod to examples of primarily Southwestern U.S. artifacts found in dry caves associated with Anasazy, Basketmaker, and Hopi cultures. We will primarily be using natural 'knees' or crooks of dense eastern hardwoods. Using hand woodworking tools, each blank will be shaped and tuned into a flying hunting stick. This is an adult class and some experience and proficiency in use of hand woodworking tools is required (as well as serious dedication to completing the project). The length of time to finish depends on the participant's carving skills and the blank chosen. Typically, one 'could' be completed in one day, but more likely up to three days. Instruction on final sanding, tuning (tweaking the flight characteristics to modify how it flies), painting or decorating, and suggestions for protective finish, will be given so it can be completed at home. Materials cost vary depending on the pre-cut blanks, from $15-35. They must be dense hardwoods with a natural curve of grain to follow the shape of the stick. Otherwise the intense shock of a thrown stick hitting a hard object would cause it to break. Participants may wish to cut and bring their own blanks, but the curve, flatness and dimensions must work for a stick or your time and effort will be for naught and find out why it's so difficult to find and harvest good, natural crook blanks suitable for this project). Class size 10

Dutch Oven Cooking Vikki Blalock

We will cook chicken and vegetables for lunch with a cobbler for dessert.

Eco-printing Colleen Hewlett

Experience the process of contact printing on natural fibers. Use leaves and other botanicals to create a print on silk, linen, or wool by creating tightly wrapped bundles which are then steamed or simmered in vinegar to set the colors. This is a perfect way to embellish previously made felted items, or instructor will have silk scarves available to purchase. Participants can also bring cotton or linen fabrics to experiment with. Materials fee only applicable if student wishes to purchase silk.

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife. Class will require a minimum of 1 1/2 days. After this ALL DAY CLASS, you have the option to drop in as the week progresses to work on your project at your own pace.

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

CONTINUATION OF CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING - NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Make Your Own Pumpdrill with James & Bob Camper Bob

Make your own pump drill using primitive tools and natural materials. Several basic skills will be covered in this class. Flint Knapping, Stone Pecking, Pitch Glue making and using, Wood working and Cordage making. Put them all together and you will have a functional pump drill of your own. All materials covered by class fee of 12 Dollars. Soapstone Drill Counterweights will be partially pre-formed to facilitate completion of project. This is an all day class taught by James Clinkscales and Camperbob Jarrell. This is an intermediate to advanced class. Basic handskills for knife and stone use are prerequisite. Sharp rocks are available in the knapping pit but a sharp knife and the basic skills for its use will be a useful addition to your creative mind and desire to learn.

Pottery and Firing Keith Grenoble

Pottery! Pottery! Pottery! Fire is an essential element in finishing your pots! Bring your pots to the fire and come learn how to properly fire them in an open fire pit. Come work with rotted rock. We'll be making bowls, cups, beads, shakers, small oil lamps, figurines - whatever your imagination desires. Pinch pots, coiling, paddling, burnishing - learn the many methods and techniques with master primitive potter Keith.

Primitive Cookout, Fall Wild Harvest Snow Bear

All ages welcome. Donations accepted.

Rivercane Flutes or Blowguns White Eagle Taylor

Make a Native American flute or blowgun, your choice. Ages 8 and up (or younger with a parent or guardian).

Southeastern Moccasin Making Jeff Gottlieb

Learn to make custom fitted traditional footwear of the Southeastern Native tribes. This is an all day class. You must bring or buy buckskin. The morning will consist of pattern making, discussion of design, choosing hides and layout. We will sew them in the afternoon! Go home with the most comfortable footwear you have ever worn!

Spoon Carving Barron Brown

Come carve your own spoon! Please bring a sharp knife. All ages welcome. Kids under 10 need to bring a parent.

The Jug Sling Knot Critter Watts

Learn one of the best ways to carry your water bottle ever invented. With this easy and versatile system, consisting of three knots, you can carry almost any water bottle hands free. Bring your water bottle and rope, paracord, or string. Or, you can purchase some from our stock for a Materials Fee.

Witching For Water Jerry TwoBear

Learn the age old secrets of dousing to find underground springs at any depth.

Saturday (10/21/2017) - Afternoon

Braided Kudzu Mask Nancy Basket

CONTINUATION FROM MORNING CLASS. Braid split kudzu and sew lengths together for a beautiful "Halloween" mask.

Cont. Making Hunting Boomerangs Denton Bragg

Drumming: Listening with the Left Hand Fuz Sanderson

Have you ever been a part of an incredible drum circle? Where the beat seems natural, the energy flows and people can't help but dance? And have you ever been part of a drum circle that was a noisy mess? What's the difference? This class helps to teach you how to be a part of creating that infectious groove, bring your non-dominant hand into drumming to improve your technique. Skills, drills, and time signatures - understanding how to turn random drumming into music! Ages 13 and up. Please bring or borrow a drum.

Flutes from Around the World - Bamboo and Rivercane Hawk Hurst

Participants will hand-craft their own traditional flutes (several cultures): both bamboo and river cane: pentatonic and diatonic scale; side and end-blown types. Ages 14 and up.. Materials/Tool Use Fee: $15

Healing stress in the modern world with food and herbs Ivy Lynn

In these times, stress is a huge issue. We will discuss how to heal ourselves by using food as medicine (mostly preventative). We will also look at how nervines will help our frayed nerves and how adaptogenic herbs can heal our adrenals. We will discuss which of these grow in this region. We will make and sample maca balls as well as sampling many of the remedies we discuss .

Hunting 101-Stalking/movement, Scouting, Blind/stand Placement, Sign Tracking and Animal behavior Bill Kaczor

During this workshop we will venture into the forest to locate deer trails, bedding areas, and feeding areas. we will then locate the prime locations to set up and build a blind. We will discuss how to move silently and undetected, control scent, use the wind in your favor, and prepare for a successful hunt.

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

CONTINUATION FROM MORNING CLASS. NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE. Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife. Class will require a minimum of 1 1/2 days. After this ALL DAY CLASS, you have the option to drop in as the week progresses to work on your project at your own pace.

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

CONTINUATION OF CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING - NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Make Your Own Pumpdrill with James & Bob Camper Bob

THIS IS A CONTINUATION FROM THIS MORNING'S CLASS.

Native American Flute Playing 101 Coyote Smith

Open to ALL AGES and levels of talent. Learn the language of the Native American flute and how to make your own music. Must bring your own flute.

Net Tying Barron Brown

Come learn how to tie a net. Great for fishing application, as well as useful for water bottle holders and knotted net bags. $1 materials fee or free if you BYO string...

Pottery and Firing Keith Grenoble

Pottery! Pottery! Pottery! Fire is an essential element in finishing your pots! Bring your pots to the fire and come learn how to properly fire them in an open fire pit. Come work with rotted rock. We'll be making bowls, cups, beads, shakers, small oil lamps, figurines - whatever your imagination desires. Pinch pots, coiling, paddling, burnishing - learn the many methods and techniques with master primitive potter Keith.

Primitive Cookout, Fall Wild Harvest Snow Bear

All ages welcome. Donations accepted.

Rawhide containers: boxes, pouches, sheathes and bottles Nick Neddo

Learn the language of this versatile material and have fun making something really useful and cool. Materials fee: $10-$20 per sq. foot.

Rivercane Flutes or Blowguns White Eagle Taylor

Make a Native American flute or blowgun, your choice. Ages 8 and up (or younger with a parent or guardian).

Southeastern Moccasin Making Jeff Gottlieb

This is a continuation from a class that began this morning. No new students, please. Learn to make custom fitted traditional footwear of the Southeastern Native tribes. This is an all day class. You must bring or buy buckskin. The morning will consist of pattern making, discussion of design, choosing hides and layout. We will sew them in the afternoon! Go home with the most comfortable footwear you have ever worn!

Spinning wool on a drop spindle Jamie Sparks

Learn to prepare and spin wool fleece to create yarn on a drop spindle. Then have the opportunity to spin your wool on different drop spindles and explore a bit of what is possible. Warning: spinning is an addictive past time!

Tarp pitching/Applied Knots Critter Watts

How to turn a tarp into a dry place! We will look at tarp pitching principles and practice techniques, as well as some associated tidbits and discussion of applied knots. This class is best enjoyed with at least a basic knowledge of knots. All necessary skills will be covered in the Saturday morning class. You will need: * blankets, pads or chairs to sit on if u like * books, rope, or tarps (optional) * water * a good attitude * questions This class is open to everybody. Children should be accompanied by an adult unless they are old enough to participate by themselves.

Womens Backcountry Health Janara Nerone

Come and gather for a lively discussion on tips and techniques for women’s health and hygiene in the backcountry from mountain guide Janara Nerone. We’ll talk about menstruation, sanitation, temperature regulation, and gear considerations. Bring your questions about how to move in harmony with the land and your womanhood, and perhaps materials with which to take notes. We will meet at the Acoustic Temple, on the wooded hill above the main event area.

Sunday (10/22/2017) - Morning

200 + Fires from a Dead Bic Lighter Critter Watts

Just because it's out of butane doesn't mean the fun is over. Quality friction fire devices are laying around all over the place. Come learn how to put them to use!

Finish Your Projects Barron Brown

Come complete your wooden projects! Don't take that project home unfinished (will you really work on it at home, really?). Enjoy the thrill of completion and proudly show your new creation to your friends. This is your chance to get it done.

Knife Making with Damian and Asa Damian Watauga

FINISHING YOUR KNIFE (THIS CLASS IS FOR STUDENTS WHO BEGAN THEIR PROJECTS EARLIER THIS WEEK)- NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE Blacksmithing A Knife Learn to make a knife from raw materials using a charcoal Japanese ground forge and readily available hand tools. Part I: forge a knife blank from high carbon steel Part II: grinding and finishing with simple hand tools Part III: hardening and tempering Part IV: setting the handle and taking home a finished knife.

Make Your Own Buckskin! Luke McLaughlin

CONTINUATION OF CLASS FROM THURSDAY MORNING - NO NEW STUDENTS PLEASE Come and learn the ancient art of making soft, supple, and durable, buckskin from deer skin! This is a 4 day class and students will need to work hard to finish their product by Sunday. Students will learn how to listen to their hide, and will get to work their hide all the way through the entire process. By end of the class you will get to take home your own hide! All you need to bring is a sharp knife, water, energy, and clothes you don't mind getting dirty and nasty!

Meditative Archery Janara Nerone

Learn archery techniques from a two-time state champion, lifetime archer, and bow huntress Janara Nerone! Janara’s style is a unique blend of instinctive shooting, medieval and renaissance archery and modern Olympic style, along with mindfulness techniques. This style is well suited to traditional bowhunters, traditional target archers and historical recreationists! Equipment provided, but please feel free to bring your own traditional or primitive bow and arrows. Come prepared to move your body! Equipment provided for 12 students. If you have your own equipment and the class is full, you are welcome to attend.

Old School Minimal Camping Camper Bob

Learn basic old school camp skills. How to pitch a simple tarp. Make a proper bedroll. Tie it all together and carry it with a tumpline/burden strap. Both traditional (i.e.canvas ground-cloth&tarp/wool blanket/leather tumpline) as well as improvised modern (i.e.plastic-nylon ground-sheet&tarp/poncho liner-/seatbelt strap-nylon webbing burden strap)will be demonstrated along with the few basic knots used. Hands on test driving of tumpline rigged bedroll and gearbox for all who want to try it. ***This is not a knot class. Knots are a basic camp skill every camper should know. You do not have to know your knots to take this class but we will not be learning how to tie them in this class***

Rivercane Flutes or Blowguns White Eagle Taylor

Make a Native American flute blowgun from rivercane, your choice. Ages 8 and up (or younger with a parent or guardian).

Sit Spot - Nature Awareness and How to Quiet your Mind Bill Kaczor

Tour Nancy Baskets Kudzu Bale Barn, Studio, & Gallery Nancy Basket

Tour my studio, gallery and kudzu bale barn. Car pool 15 min away. See 8 ft sculptures. Hear stories, get back for closing ceremony.

Working out the Kinks: Hips & Lower Back Bill Parravano

Teach your body to recover faster after primitive & homesteading skills. Got a sore, stiff, tight, achy, or painful hips and lower back? Then this class is for you! Learn the secrets of your body's nervous system. You will walk away from this class with a working knowledge of how to eliminate tension in these areas of your body no matter what your age. Bring your own pillows, blankets and yoga mats to get the most benefit out of this class

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